Aug
30

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I’m using this blog post to recognize the significant accomplishments of a Trajectory client, and to share how this organization has radically challenged convention and expectation to re-energize both its audiences and the organization itself.

Alpha Chi Omega is a national women’s organization represented in 40 states, with more than 200,000 members who join during their undergraduate college years and hopefully, remain members for the rest of their lives.

This past week, following our rebranding of the organization, ACO launched its new website. This was the final step in bringing its Real. Strong. Women. brand promise to life. In so doing, it changed the game for its members. And for the organization itself.

The new site changes the paradigm of the online experience for this forward thinking sorority to strengthen interactions, connections and conversations among its members. Its design, content and functionality offers both an information portal and community hub, further delivering on its promise to change the conversation for all Alpha Chi Omega women.

Among its many features, the site can be personalized to each Alpha Chi Omega member’s needs and interests by implementing a customizable platform within a sub site, My Alpha Chi. This is a major step forward for the organization, as the site is now relevant to all members regardless of lifestage or lifestyle. Other features of My Alpha Chi include:

• Starting Conversations – Alpha Chi Omega’s Blog
• Real Strong Woman of the Month – Stories of Alpha Chi Omegas who are making a difference.
• AX! Message Boards – Discuss issues whether Alpha Chi Omega or not.
• The Lyre Online – Top stories from The Lyre magazine.
• Connect with Alpha Chi –Twitter, Facebook, Delicious, Flickr, LinkedIn and YouTube.

From the time that we had our first conversation with Alpha Chi Omega, they talked about two things. First, changing how women think and act about the idea of sorority. Second, changing the expectation of how a sorority will thrive, and be defined in the future. Their last major step in this journey is now complete. And for that, we congratulate this game-changing organization.

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Aug
26

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Mayo’s reputation for being a forerunner when it comes to all things “social media” isn’t news to those in and around the healthcare space. But even I was surprised at this finding.

As part of some secondary research for another client, we visited a lot of healthcare organization’s Facebook pages. Mayo has 8,811 fans. That’s a big number (at least in healthcare). Far greater than many other well-known institutions.

This means that 8,811 people are listening, discussing, messaging, updating, receiving Mayo’s feeds (which in turn gives these fans some viral power), interacting with Mayo and connecting with other people just like them (which we know in healthcare is very powerful in terms of improving health outcomes for people with a range of conditions).

Most importantly, this means that 8,811 people are telling (and participating in) personal and honest, living and breathing, powerful and overwhelmingly positive stories about Mayo in ways that traditional communications just can’t convey. Though I still believe that social media is not a single solution in itself, but one element of an integrated marketing communications plan.

It’s always been that people’s stories are important, not those of the organization. What an incredible, equity-enhancing benefit it is to have 8,000 plus people socially and passionately involved with your brand, while letting you (the marketer) actually spread your message more effectively.

Kudos (once again) to Mayo.

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Aug
23

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What companies are doing on the social web and how well they’re doing it.

This July 2009 study called Engagement db, prepared by Wetpaint and Altimeter reviewed and charted the top 100 brands based on their social media presence and level of engagement they have with their customers. And though there are no healthcare brands included, I think the findings are still relevant (supported by these few examples).

A few of the key insights include:

1. Having a presence on social networks and micro-blogging outlets is a must, as “social media reach alone may have a positive impact as the more touch-points used can cause a ripple effect, by increasing or boosting brand recognition and driving sales volume.” I have a feeling that Lee Aase, Manager, Syndication and Social Media at Mayo Clinic would agree.

2. Doing nothing is not an option, but doing it all may not be appropriate. Building a social media strategy depends on many factors including who your target is, your industry, etc. However, being where your customers are and a part of their online experience is critical. Humana made the decision to step-lightly-into social media, as the benefits (to deepen connections with consumers; collaborate better with doctors and hospitals) became apparent to the organization.

3. Find your sweet spot. Understand what resonates with your customers and engage with them using the channels they frequent and prefer. If resources are an issue – start small, lobby for more assets and engage fully. Hello Health is a new organization that mixes office and online visits to give patients personal attention when and how they want it.

The future of health + healthy lifestyle brand marketing is not about saying things to audiences. It is about saying and doing this with them.

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Aug
20

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As an addendum to my previous post, here are twelve principles for becoming a connecting versus campaigning organization. I refer to these principles as an Attraction Manifesto because of what “manifesto” implies – passion, game-changing, an appropriately public (social) declaration of your intentions and how you’ll set out to achieve them.

And because it’s a manifesto, it asks others to join together to make it a reality. Clearly, you’ll need to put your own spin on this doctrine to make it actionable for your organization and your audiences (which I hope you’ll do).

1. Coherence – our brand idea will serve as the nucleus for all of our actions, interactions and conversations.
2. Authenticity – our social media conversations should be similar to our daily interactions with friends, colleagues and family, i.e. open and honest, informal and in a personal voice.
3. Transparency – we’ll represent ourselves as people rather than an organization, because people connect with people, not organizations. We’ll also be honest about who we are, as trust is a huge barometer of engagement.
4. Collaborative – we’ll embrace the fact that true conversations are two-way, give and take exchanges; so that all participants ultimately grow stronger together.
5. Customized – we’ll create specific interest content and communities (thereby enhancing relevance to audiences) by collecting, categorizing, listening and responding.
6. Facilitating – we’ll allow conversations to go on around us without trying to control them, empowering people to connect through our brand, with content as the enabler.
7. Contagious – we’ll create “life-impacting” content and conversations that generate word-of-mouth and that people want to share with others.
8. Co-Creation – by working together, we all learn, grow and become stronger.
9. Evangelists – as feasible, we’ll create passionate and active advocates who will want to spread our message (for little expense).
10. Paced – we’ll start small, do what we can, when we can.
11. Context – we’ll recognize that social media is not a single solution in itself, but one element of an integrated marketing communications plan.
12. Bottom Line – there are lots of ways to measure social media success; so we’ll determine our success metrics (based on our objectives) before we begin our efforts.

As I’ve said previously, you have the opportunity now to benefit your organization by involving and empowering your audiences in conversations by being where they are and making it easier for them to connect, get informed and take action. It’s not a matter of “if”, but “when.” So what are you waiting for?

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Aug
17

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For healthcare marketers, there’s a new set of rules for connecting your brand to your employees, caregivers, communities and patients. And it requires you to let go of what you think you know.

Continuing to try to persuade audiences through traditional campaigning about why you’re better (in the absence of other efforts), with the use of rational information and comparative data, is just not that important to those you’re trying to connect with.

There are two reasons for this. First, because the harsh reality is that people really don’t care about your organization, per se. What they do care about is how you make them feel about themselves and their decisions, and how much value you add to their lives. It’s their stories that are important, not yours. Second, because those who used to be your “passive audiences” are now “engaged participants” and content creators through social media.

The future of healthcare marketing is not about saying things to caregivers, communities and patients. It is about saying and doing things with them. It is about ATTRACTION MARKETING , compelling them to become more deeply engaged with your brand, while letting you (the healthcare marketer) actually spread your commercial message more effectively.

Today, brands are products of two-way (social) conversations. These conversations are personal and honest, living and breathing. With each conversation made stronger by other conversations, and building value for all parties involved. They result in competitive advantage for your organization, and significant advances in knowledge for your audiences. Each helps the other to reach their full potential.

Yet many in healthcare haven’t embraced this new reality. The reality that it pays from a relationship and financial standpoint to engage in two-way dialogue (i.e. social media). So what’s holding you back? Maybe you’re afraid of the unknown, or that your world is changing. Maybe you’re not comfortable with these new Social tools, or you don’t think you have the time. But to borrow a phrase from Cher in her movie Moonstruck when she slaps Nicholas Cage – “snap out of it”.

Because while you or your organization is hesitant to use social media, consumers actually become more invested in brands that welcome their participation. Simply put, conversations between people do more to build connections beyond your one-way campaigns. And what’s great about Social, and why it’s such a wonderful adjunct to traditional media, is that people can engage in these conversations whenever it’s convenient for them.

Integral to the future of healthcare brand building will be shared, “real-time” interactions and conversations between providers, caregivers, patients and communities. You have the opportunity now to benefit your healthcare organization by involving and empowering these audiences in conversations by being where they are and making it easier for them to connect, get informed and take action.

It’s not a matter of “if”, but “when.” So what are you waiting for?

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Aug
13

Following a recent post of mine about a company named Afterheels, which created a new market space and new value for customers by walking in their shoes (to the extreme delight of its female audience), I’m sharing this article written by Matthew E. May called Customer-Centric Design: Got Empathy.

He points out that there are at least three ways to gain real insight into a customer problem:

1. Observe – watch the customer
2. Infiltrate – become the customer
3. Collaborate – involve the customer

Read on.

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Jul
31

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The Future Is Now For Virtual House Calls, is the title of this Wired article from Ryan Singel.

Cisco and UnitedHealth Group are spending millions on an initiative that they hope will make virtual house calls a big part of our medical care. Here’s the idea – reduce the number of “get in our car” office visits, extend specialist care to remote areas and make routine follow-ups simpler than ever. Singel likens it to a web chat in 1080HD with an assistant next to you wielding the digital otoscope that is instantly uploading high quality video of your ear canal to your doctor.

The numbers underscore the opportunity. According to UnitedHealth, the market for telemedicine will grow from $900 million this year to more than $6 billion in 2012. UH and Cisco are betting that remote health care technology will no longer be limited to treating astronauts, African villagers and oil rig workers.

For more on this story, our future and how UH and Cisco are trying to broker the concept to large medical groups, click here.

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Jul
29

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For the first time ever, one marketing campaign took home a Grand Prix award in three categories simultaneously (direct, cyber and PR) at the International Cannes Advertising Festival. The campaign was called the Best Job In The World and, as written about on Influential Marketing Blog, was “essentially a big online job search conducted through social media for a new caretaker for Hamilton Island in Queensland, Australia.”
The campaign was a huge success, logging 34,000 video entries from applicants in 200 countries, and more than 7 million visitors to the site who generated nearly 500,000 votes. This was achieved with a relatively limited budget of $1.7 million dollars.
A big part of the success of this campaign, states R. Bhargava, Blog author, was not what they were marketing, but how they used social media to do it. Here are the lessons he offers, along with some from our own firm’s playbook for energizing brands and customers, that anyone trying to promote a product or service (whether b2c or b2b) could use.

1. Make it believable. While you might not be able to support a quantifiable claim, can you dovetail what people’s definition of a dream (product, service, vacation, experience, etc.) might be.

2. It’s not about how much you spend. If you have something to say, and its compelling enough that other people are willing to/can’t help but talk about, social media and public relations can scale the message beyond traditional advertising.

3. Content trumps traffic. Many programs set out with a goal of generating traffic. But this is like ordering dessert before your entree. You need great content first. More people talking about your brand is a prelude to building traffic.

4. Compel content creation. While only a small percentage of social network participants are creating the conversation (between 1-10%), their influence spans way beyond – to passive consumers, those who forward and share, critics who comment on content and those who edit content created by others.

5. Be contagious. Build in a sharable component that motivates/incentivizes people to share with others. While traditional media is all about telling a great big one-way story to as many people as possible, social media enables lots of different conversations among lots of people at the same time.

6. Make it multi-dimensional. Social media is both philosophy and practice. About speaking with, not “to” or “at” people. While the philosophy spans and informs an integrated strategy, the actual tools are but one component of an integrated communications mix.

7. Build trust . You need to let go, as you’ve already lost your grip. Trust it to customers (and employees) to carry messages forward. Realize that we trust each other’s recommendations and opinions (proven across a number of different studies) more than we do television, magazines, radio and sponsorships.

8. Transparency. Your customers don’t spend time thinking about your company. You’re just not a priority. What is important, however, is how you make them feel, how you can help them succeed in their business or simply how you can improve their lives.

9. Keep it simple. Our most personal, important and enduring communications are the simplest – I Love You, I Do, We’re Through, He’s Gone. Powerful stories are simply told. If you can’t crystallize your story, how can consumers possibly get it.

10. Co-create value. Feed your customers by being interesting and being useful. They’ll return the favor. In the end, you both become stronger.

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Jul
27

Many organizations lack the time, budget or experience to start “social media” activities from scratch. Alexandra Samuel, who writes for Harvard Business Publishing, offers these three great options for robust social media presences that let you manage cost and risk by building on existing tools and established best practices.

Read her excellent blog post in which you’ll find the “what, how and where”, along with examples of companies putting these tools to good use – Three Instantly Effective Social Media Strategies.

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Jul
24

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Coca-Cola’s testing a new “fountain of the future” – the Freestyle – which dispenses more than 100 flavor options. You can read the full Fast Company newsletter story here (though the video seems to be private). While the machines are currently being tested in Georgia, California and Utah, the company plans to place 60 test dispensers around the country by the end of the summer.

Coke’s changed the game, for itself and its customers (both current and new), by:

• Raising selection well above others
• Creating the ability for customers to create their own new flavor combinations, thereby adding fun & adventure to the heretofore mundane process of ordering a “ginger ale.”

No doubt, this concept has great “social” legs. People will be tweeting about the flavors they were able to order, the new flavor combinations they’ve come up with and even the new names they give to these flavors. In turn, Coke is provided with tremendous content and promotional opportunity.

But enough about Coke. What are you doing to change the game for your customers? How are you delighting them in new and unexpected ways? What’s your version of the 100-flavor combination? Take one hour today alone or with your team to brainstorm your own “Freestyle.” Guarantee the ideas will flow (pardon the pun).

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